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RAILWAYS OF THE WORLD

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PERU RAILWAYS - PERURAIL - F.C.C.A. - CENTRAL RAILWAY - SOUTHERN RAILWAY
CUSCO AND SANTA ANA RAILWAY - HUANCAYO AND HUANCAVELICA RAILWAY YAURICOCHA RAILWAY - CERRO DE PASCO - ENAFER

ECUADOR RAILWAYS - FERROCARRILL ECUATORIANA
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IBARRA - PRIMER PASO - LITA - EL PROGRESO - SAN LORENZO

IRISH RAIL - NORTHERN IRELAND RAILWAYS - TRALEE AND BLENNERVILLE STEAM RAILWAY
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EUROPEAN RAILWAYS : HARZER-SCHMALSPUR-BAHNEN-RASENDER ROLAND - MOLLI GERMAN STEAM RAILWAYS - CZECH RAILWAYS - MAJORCAN RAILWAYS
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ROMANIAN RAILWAYS - SPANISH RAILWAYS - SLOVAK RAILWAYS

Updated : 12th. April 2008

CERRO DE PASCO RAILWAY
This page covers the Cerro De Pasco Railway in Central Peru operating from La Oroya to Cerro de Pasco.

It is heavy mountain railroading operating at altitudes from over 10,000 feet to 17,000 feet. Originaly, it was a separate railway but is now operated by the FCCA.

CERRO DE PASCO, or PASC0, a mining town of Peru, is the capital of the department of Junin, 107 is 107 miles from Lima by road or 221 miles via La Oroya by rail. It is situated on the plateau of Bombon, 14,280 ft. above sea-level, and in the midst of one of the oldest arid richest silver-mining districts of Peru. There were 342 silver mines in this district in 1890, and at the end of the 19th century the average annual output since the discovery of the mines in 1630 was estimated at 6oo,ooo oz.

A decline in the silver production having set in, the American company which had become owners of three-fourths of the mining properties in the district turned its attention to the extensive copper deposits there. Owing to the high weight of the product and the lack of roads they built instead a standard gauge railway to La Oroya some 83 miles away. There they connected with what was then the Central Railway of Peru owned by a London Company the Peruvian Corporation Limited.

A further railway was built 25 miles to the coal-fields of Gollarisquisga, north of Pasco, and there erected large smelting works (in which 2500 men were regularly employed in 1907) 8 m. out of town and 4 m. from limestone beds.

The railway to Oroya was completed in 1903, the coal mine branch and smelter later on, and in 1907 the copper output was 20,152,000 lb. The town of Pasco was and is badly built and unattractive, and is inhabited chiefly by mining laborers and their families. Its population is increased 50% in times of great mining activity. The name Cerro de Pasco is that of a knot of mountains uniting the two great ranges of the Andes at this point.

Current motive power consist of the mainstay of FCCA Alco's now supplanted by a handful of EMD's and also recently added secondhand GE locos. Details of the motive power can be found in the FCCA section.

Railway starts in La Oroya which is a mining and smelter town. The cliffs are white with chalk. Loco 538 is an Alco of 1965 vintage.

24 is the local shunter, an EMD 8-567C.

A few miles out of town in order to gain height a zig-zag is necessary.

Here we are pulling out of the top of the zigzag.

Already at 11,000 feet we have a stiff climb ahead.

The railway climbs up the valley.

How the rest of the world lives!

This is heavy mountain railroading with long trains.

The mountains are overpowering.

Plenty fo water and waterfalls. Rather like Ireland.

Here we meet one of the new GE locos on its way down with probably 2,000 tons.

This could be taken in Kerry! Sheep on the line!

All out to shunt the cheap.

The local shepherds think its great fun.

On our way again.

We certainly have a long trains and need good brakes as Alcos have little dynamic braking.

We are now entering the vast altiplano at about 16,000 feet.

A trainside graveyard. Heaven knows why here!

Peru's second largest lake, Lake Junin, is in the distance.

Beautiful scenery.

Local fishers materialise from nowhere.

Shepherds temporary home while they watch their flocks.

And the occasional town really in the middle of nowhere.

Some have sheep. These people have horses.

A remote hostel.

Cerro De Pasco town in the distance.

Barren desolate with poor, sometimes no, roads.

At 17,000 feet it can be 70 degrees and sunny one moment and snowing the next.

A class 1 pothole.

It is midday and snowing and passing vehicles quite a trick if you do not like swimming.

Robust is not exactly a term you would use for the bridges. Broken windscreens are normal.

Plenty of snow on the road.

This believe it or not is the passenger station.

Alco 609 parks the train and prepares to sort the wagons.

A whole reception committee came out ot greet the first train. They spoke no English, I spoke no Spanish so I would like to have seen the TV interview I did. Webmaster is middle back and in front of him FCCA Manager Lucia Casaverde who did a super job.

Webmaster, Lucia and local reception committee.

Webmaster standing at the station, waiting for the train.....

The waiting room was a little cold in the evening while waiting for the train. It was 6 p.m. and temperature was already below freezing.

We then set off for the stone forests of Huallay as the locals wished to show us the attractions.

A ghost rider appears from nowhere travelling across the vast altiplano.

From the distance the stone forests are amazing.

The shapes are only fantastic.

Arches abound.

The altiplano through an arch.

No comment.

Weird, wonderful, beautiful.

Words fail to describe the beautiful sculptures in the rock.

Webmaster loose as usual.

More wonderful shapes.

What is it about too many cooks?

Dinner being got ready at 17,000 feet.

A whole new light on the meaning of the word "public toilet".

Three very charming lcoal guides.

The road into the stone forest.

Our bus in the middle of the subsequent "road".

Now onto Tarma where we have a picture of the webmaster in about thirty years time.

The church is typical Peruvian...

As is the graveyard. You can be on top of your beloved even in death!

For the flower festival they lay flowers on the sidewalks..

with many different patterns.

Very carefully...

And beautifully done.

The lamposts are magnificent.

They bring boxes of flowers.

And finally the launderette.